06 February 2012 ~ 1 Comment

The Best of Drabblecast 2011

written by David Steffen

And, here’s the list for one of my favorite publications–the Drabblecast.  It’s great for my weekly fix of weird.  They’ve been of consistently high quality, and I look forward especially to Lovecraft Month in which they solicit original cosmic horror from recent popular authors.

I’ve gotten more involved in the Drabblecast in this last year as well.  A few months ago Norm asked me if I’d be interested in reading slush for the Drabblecast (due to the time spent commenting on their story forum, I suppose).  Also, their art director Bo Kaier organized the Drabble Art Reclamation Project (DARP) in which fans could volunteer to produce art for past episodes before Drabblecast had art.  If you want to hear more, check out the link to this page, where I showed each artwork that I finished, step by step.  And check out Drabblecast’s new website.

Okay, on to the list.  This covers all the episodes published in 2011.  This covers episodes 194-229.  Many of those were Trifects and Doubleheaders, so the total number of stories is about 47.

Without further ado, the list:

1.  The Wish of the Demon Achtromagk by Eugie Foster
This was one of Drabblecast’s commissioned stories for what is now the traditional Lovecraft month.  The demon Achtromagk crosses over into our world from its own dimension and takes  the fearsome form of…  a little girl’s teddy bear.

2.  Death Comes But Twice by Mary Robinette Kowal
A classic style of writing reiminiscent of H.G. Wells.  A classically told yarn, masterfully narrated by Larry Santoro, in which a scientist discovers an elixir of immortality, but there’s a catch.

3.  In the Octopus’s Garden by James S. Dorr
This one bothers me a bit in that I had already written a story with a very similar premise (though it went in a very different direction).  You are what you eat, or in this case, what eats you is you.

4.  The Last Question by Isaac Asimov
Classic science fiction story that has aged surprisingly well.  Which is especially surprising, since it contains humor, and it’s very hard to write humor that works across decades.  In the tradition of golden age SF, it is built much more around the science fictional idea than around characters, but that’s okay–the idea is enough to carry it.

5.  The Heroics of Interior Design by Elise R. Hopkins
Have you noticed that all of the “empowered” beings in superhero comic books, those powers are always useful in some way?  This is incredibly improbable, considering most of them got their abilities by freak mutations, caused by radiation or other causes.  Where are the people with the less useful abilities?  Well, here is one such, a “super” who can turn blue things yellow, and what they choose to do with their power.  I found this one fun for the things it pointed out, and found it very relatable.

Honorable Mentions:

At the End of the Hall by Nick Mamatas

Broken by Steven Saus
This one was particularly exciting for me in a unique way.  Since I’ve been taken on as a slushreader, I’ve voted up a few stories for Norm to take a look at.  This is the first one that ended up being published, so I was very excited to see it appear.

 Killipedes by Jens Rushing

 

One Response to “The Best of Drabblecast 2011”

  1. Steven Saus 17 February 2012 at 1:59 pm Permalink

    Hey – I’m really glad you liked “Broken”, and thanks for the mention here as well.


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