14 November 2014 ~ 4 Comments

Interview: Jacey Bedford

Jacey BedfordJacey Bedford uses the Milford Method for workshopping/critiquing. She uses Diabolical Plots’ Submissions Grinder for submitting. Her debut novel is 171,000 words, so she apparently doesn’t suffer from writer’s block. She has been participating in workshopping/critiquing 20 years. She is one of the organizers of the Northwrite SF Writers’ Group and the Milford SF Writers Conference. She is represented by Maass agent Amy Boggs, who was also interviewed by Diabolical Plots. She has signed a 3 book contract with DAW and Empire of Dust is out this month.

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27 October 2014 ~ 1 Comment

Interview: Betsy Wollheim

625529_576885235658092_918951020_nBetsy Wollheim has an advantage unique in speculative fiction book publishing. She is owner, editor, and publisher of DAW and it is a private company. She recently won her first Hugo for Best Editor. She tells Diabolical Plots what she wants and doesn’t want from authors.

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15 September 2014 ~ 3 Comments

Laura Resnick on Cover Art

MisCookLaura Resnick has authored 6 fantasy-detective-comedy novels (the Esther Diamond series from Daw), 3 fantasy novels (the Silerian trilogy from Tor), 15 romance novels (from Silhouette), many short stories (mostly in DAW anthologies), several essays on print and screen fiction, and “Rejection, Romance, and Royalties: The Wacky World of a Working Writer.”

She won the Campbell award for best writer and was a finalist for the Rita award. She won the Romantic Times Magazine award 3 times. She writes “The Mad Scribbler,” a monthly opinion column for Nink. For the Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers of America’s bulletin, she wrote a quarterly opinion column, “The Filthy Pro.” She wrote a monthly column, “The Comely Curmedgeon,” for Nink. She has served as member of the board of directors, president elect, and president of Novelists, Inc.

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30 September 2013 ~ 0 Comments

Review: Throne of the Crescent Moon

Throne of the Crescent Moon is an epic fantasy story focused mainly around the ghul hunter Adoulla Makhslood and his assistant Raseed bas Raseed. Adoulla is the last member of his profession left in the world, with his stainless white kaftan that represents his profession. He’s not what you might expect from the job title, though, a fat and grumpy old man who’d like nothing better than to retire, drink tea, and rekindle a lost love who was driven away by his work. But if he retired, there would be no ghul hunters to oppose those who would raise monstrous ghuls from the elements to gain power in the world. Raseed bas Raseed is a young and lightning-fast dervish, a holy warrior who is a deadly fighter, but who is often unprepared for the hars realities of the world and who often finds himself and others failing to meet his lofty standards. Adoulla has hunted many ghuls over his decades of work, and Raseed has gained some experience alongside Adoulla, but now they are facing a new threat more dire than any that either of them have ever faced before, more dire than they thought possible. It will take all of their best efforts and great assistance from their friends to see them successfully through this trial. The fate of the world as they know it depends upon them.

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29 July 2013 ~ 0 Comments

My Hugo Ballot 2013

I’ve spent the last several months reviewing award nominees. I decided to take it one step further and post the final decisions that I plan to post to my Hugo ballot with explanations (where I deem them necessary) about why I voted the way I did. I encourage anyone reading this to post discussion in the comments about how they voted, why I am wrong in my choices, etc.

What makes this more interesting is that the Hugo Awards use an instant runoff voting system. You rank your changes from 1-x, and can also set a number to the “No Award” category. You can find all the nitty gritty details at the Hugo Page explaining votes. I like the system a lot, much more than just a simple single-cast vote, because if your primary vote is for the least popular story, your other preferences still count for something.

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