Daily Science Fiction: July Review

Fall is here but memories of a warm summer resurface when I compiled these reviews from my wonderful friends. The June reviews were ones I reserved for myself but while I worked on them my rock-solid cohorts plugged away at July. Mr Anonymous, Dustin Adams, and James Hanzelka have done their diligence and gave these wonderful works of art the once over,

Daily Science Fiction: June Review

At the time that I am writing this, DSF has passed its first year of publication. No news has surfaced on whether it is now a SFWA qualifying market. With a subscriber base of over 2600 and website that receives 10,000 visitors a month, I can only imagine that it is the-powers-that-be have yet to do the necessary homework to determine what most of us know already; they’re one of the most widely read speculative fiction venues out there right now.

Daily Science Fiction: April Review

Cripes! When was the last time I posted a review? Falling behind, falling behind. Someone needs to review these finely crafted tales. Too bad those someone’s aren’t Locus, Tangent Online, or one of those other award nominated reviewing sites. One of these days the rest of the industry will acknowledge the fine work posted at DSF, and Jon and Michelle’s innovative idea of using the internet. One of these days they all will! You’ll see!

Daily Science Fiction: February Review

This month we have the return of Cat Rambo and the debut of the very successful Jay Lake, but it is also the month that has the most unfamiliar authors to me yet. I believe it is because this is when Daily Science Fiction had reached its stride in the industry. Because of the its pay scale, ease of its submission process, volume of material needed, and friendly availability to its readers; the amount of fresh material and authors — both pro and amateur — likely surpassed or equaled any other publication about the time Jon and Michele received the stories that ended up in this month’s email out.

Daily Science Fiction: January Review

written by Frank Dutkiewicz A correction is in order for last months review. I called the leading Sci-Fi news outlet in the industry Lotus when every other person on the planet knows it’s Locus. Big mistake, won’t make it again. The new year marks the beginning of the Alphabet Quartet contributions. Tim Pratt, Jenn Reese, … Continue reading Daily Science Fiction: January Review

Daily Science Fiction: December Review

On the day I am writing this, Daily Science Fiction is marking its 7th month of production. The online publication is listed with 41 other pro-paying publications on Ralan. I counted only 6 that offer a better rate for its authors (8 cents a word). Most have a guideline that is narrower on the type of speculative fiction they want, a few have a word count ceiling as high (10,000), and none publish as much as they have. After reviewing four months of DSF, I can’t help but notice the brightest and freshest writers in speculative fiction today have graced its pages (or web pages if you prefer).

Daily Science Fiction: November Review

Last month’s review started a bit of controversy. I am delighted Daily Science Fiction received extra attention because of it. They deserve it. Here’s hoping the editors and magazine get recognition in the form of nominations and awards. As one who has read and reviewed an issue of almost every major publication, I can say after reading the first three months, they consistently produce the strongest material in the market today.

Review: Writers of the Future XXVI

Time for my yearly review, Yippee! Last year I wrote a very long analysis on the winning story and another that I really, and of the authors that wrote them. A few took my comments as needlessly personal. I regret that. I was only attempting to illustrate the first impressions I had of Jordan Lapp and Emery Huang, which were swept aside when I read their stories. I by no means meant that either of them acted or did anything wrong. In fact, I think every author is entitled to a little self-promotion and should take full advantage of their fifteen minutes of fame in hopes of stretching it out into a life-long center stage.